• In Romney Clan, the Foot Doesn't Fall Far from the Mouth

    By now, we're all familiar with Mitt Romney's penchant for cringe-worthy gaffes about his own massive wealth. There was the accidental admission that his wife drives "a couple of Cadillacs," his friends own NASCAR teams, he likes "being able to fire people" and of course, that he's "not concerned about the very poor."

    But what seemed like an individual quirk might be a deadly inherited condition

    [S]o far, Mitt's verbal flubs still fall short of his father's. George Romney was forced to drop out of the presidential race in 1968 after uttering one of the most ruinous gaffes in modern politics, a 50-megaton slip of the tongue… If Romney history continues to repeat itself, Mitt's most stupendous gaffe is still to come…

    George took seemingly contradictory stands on many issues, including the war in Vietnam… Romney conceded that he had changed his views on the war, but claimed that when he had toured Vietnam in 1965, he'd been misled by overly-optimistic reports from American military and diplomatic officials.

    Then George Romney uttered the line that would haunt him for the rest of his life: "Well, you know, when I came back from Vietnam, I'd just had the greatest brainwashing that anybody can get."

    Rick Santorum may have a Google problem, but it looks like Mitt Romney's got a Romney problem. From flip-flopping to embarrassing gaffes, Romney's biggest liability is his own mouth. No wonder the candidate hasn't spoken to the national press in over 20 days and had an Economist reporter arrested.

    So please, donate to the Romney campaign. You can help cure Mitt Romney, and the entire Romney family, of this debilitating condition of verbal diarrhea. Every dollar you give to Romney will help him win over GOP voters without actually talking to voters.

    Photo by Bryan Mitchelll/Getty Images News/Getty Images


    Tags: Economy, George Romney, Mitt Romney, Primaries, Vietnam

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