• Ten Great Moments in Political Misspellings

    1. Mitt Romney's campaign misspells America as Amercia. Amercian Acceptionalism has never been so exceptionable.

    2. But he was not the first to sing the praises of Amercia the Beautiful, whose fruited plains were first extolled by Tea Party protesters in 2010.

    3. Rick Santorum's campaign sent reporters an email titled "MEDIA ADVISORY: SANTORUM'S PUBIC SCHEDULE." 15 minutes later, staffers sent a correction, though Santorum himself remained obsessed with all things pubic.

    4. Jon Huntsman inaugurated his 2012 campaign with an event at the Statue of Liberty that featured press passes reading "John Huntsman for President"  – adding an unnecessary H in the candidate's first name. The same mistake was made in mailers sent to New Hampshire voters. If only the votes for John Huntsman could be combined with the votes for Jon Huntsman, 2012's most sane Republican contender would… still have lost.

    5. In 2010, an Illinois Green Party gubernatorial candidate name's was spelled "Rich Whitey" on electronic voting machines stationed in numerous majority-black Chicago wards.  And the guy's real name wasn't even Willard Romney. It was Rich Whitney.

    6. During the 2010 Senate race in Alaska, Joe Miller filed suit arguing that voters who misspelled  "Murkowski" or "Lisa Murkowski" did not intend to vote for the incumbent senator. Easy argument for a guy named Miller.

    7. An attack ad against Republican Scott Brown authorized by Democratic Attorney General Martha Coakley and paid for by the state's Democratic Party spelled the state the two were competing to represent in the Senate as "Massachusettes." The error became the least embarrassing aspect of the Coakley campaign.

    8. In 2009, Pat Buchanan and white supremacist Peter Brimelow spoke about English-only initiatives beneath a banner reading 2009 National Conferenece. I can see why they're so exercised about the issue.

    9. Though there have been many challengers, from "Anmesty" to "Make English America's Offical Language," the classic in protest remains "Get a Brain! Morans," courtesy of a proud American standing outside a Boeing plant in 2003.

    10. "You're close, but you left a little something off. The e on the end." – Vice President Dan Quayle "correcting" a student's spelling of potato in 1992.

    Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images


    Tags: Dan Quayle, Joe Miller, Jon Huntsman, Lisa Murkowski, Martha Coakley, Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Tea Party

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